Tuesday, October 2, 2007

Anatomy of a Well Written Song by Carlton Richard

Anatomy of a Well Written Song by Carlton Richard


Well most beginner artists and producers know that a song has to have a beginning, middle, and end. A well written song also has a story outline that explains,what's taking place. For example a love ballard usually is about one person who's madly in love with another person that may or maynot feel the same about them. This could be considered the topic. Now that we have established the topic, let's establish the main action in the story outline. For example in the love ballad the man sings crying out to his girl friend who just recently dediced to end their relationship.He responds by singing to her in the rain (corny but stay with me) the main action would be him singing to win her heart back. As a result of the main action she will either stay or continue to crush his poor little heart. Which brings us to the ending action, if she stays then the end will be happy and they will hold hands walking together in the park,it will stop raining and the sun will shine brightly. If she still does want him , then he will be struck by lighting as he walk away. So what does all this mean? It's merely a suggestion to write out the story line,first instead of going full speed ahead into a song, this well help your writing skills by keeping your words flowing, telling a story and establishing a beginning, middle and end that the listeners can follow.

How to Pitch your Songs to Music Publisers by Carlton Richard

How to Pitch your Songs to Music Publisers by Carlton Richard


Pitching songs to record label and/or publishers can be as challenging as hitting a home run in a major league baseball game. Ok so you've got your mixed and mastered song in hand, Now your ready to start pitching. First things first you have to know who your pitching to, If your a explicit metal rock band wouldn't want to pitch to the disney channel. So do your research and find the music publishers that distribute and promote your style of music. Next you have to find away to make your marketing package standout. If your sending your package via email, then make sure you chose pictures that are eye poping and grab the attention,usually rich colors like red, green,gold will to the trick.For physical mail you should call first and find out what the A&R or Music Director likes to snack on and present that along with your package. You really have to be creative remember your 1 of hundreds each day, so besides having a really great song you have to work twice as hard just to be heard. It's also a good idea to mention that you will be sending your material and tell them when to expect it, every bit counts and while your at get the name of the person you speak to, this is a great way to get yourself ahead. Inside your package make sure all your contact info is in plain view and easy to read. Be consistent but don't be a pests, call once a week to check your material and include a return postage for critiques. It may take a whie to hit that home run but it sure feels good when you do and all the frustration you felt striking out goes away,so batter up!!

Make Your Own Beats: Using FL Studio by RingFingerUP! Media

Make Your Own Beats: Using FL Studio by RingFingerUP! Media


While some people swear by certain software (or hardware for that matter), it all comes down, once again, to preference. It's always debatable which software provides the best tools, but the "best" tools is subjective and can differ from person to person. Just like how some people will swear on oath that the Mac is the best computer out, PC users will tell you otherwise, or vice versa. The best way to find out which one works best for you is to try them out. Luckily, like most software out, vendors usually offer users trial versions of there software or sometimes even no-time limit versions and instead disable some functions, such as saving or exporting your creations. This gives you the opportunity to try different ones out and see which one works best for you. Some people base their opinion on the different features a program offers while others may base their decision on how easy it is to use. For the purpose this guide, we'll clue you in on the best software out there, that won't break the bank. The centerpiece of your production studio will be your sequencer.

The Sequencer: The sequencer will be the main production tool in your arsenal; so needless to say, it's important to choose one that you're most comfortable with and increases your productivity. In essence, the sequencer is the platform you will use to make your own beats on; from laying down your patterns to creating the foundation of your track. Two of the more popular loop-based software sequencers out there that hip-hop beat makers may use are Propellerhead's Reason and Image-Line's FL Studio (previously known as Fruityloops). This free online guide will focus on using FL Studio. FL Studio comes in three different flavors: the Producer Edition, the Fruity Edition, and the Express Edition. The Producer Edition is one of the more expensive editions at $149 and evidently has the most features, while the other two are $99 and $49 respectively. The Producer Edition is more of a pattern-based Digital Audio Workstation (or DAW) in the sense that it's more than just a sequencer, but a "do-it-all" program and can be the standalone, centerpiece of your entire studio. For the sake of this free guide, you should have at least the Fruity Edition as the Express Edition cannot be used as a standalone sequencer and requires other software to control it. For more information on the different type's available visit FL Studio's software page.In my own opinion, FL Studio is the best value, as it's only $149 for the Producer Edition compared to Reason's $499 price tag and comes with a lifetime of free updates. That means whenever a newer version comes out, you can upgrade absolutely free! If you would like to try the software before buying it, trial versions are available for download at the Image-Line website.

The Sound Editor: Just like software sequencers, there are several sound editors available. The basic function of a sound editor is to edit wave files which can be especially helpful with sample-based production. Sample-based production essentially is using samples (a portion of an audio track) as the foundation to your music. These samples can be obtained from old records, sample CDs, or recorded from an instrument. With that in mind, the sound editor is particularly helpful when "chopping" up loops or drum breaks, or sampling sounds as it gives you a close-up visual representation of the sound file you're working on. Whether using your own samples, sound banks, or synthesizers, you'll find a sound editor extremely helpful and essential to your home studio. Some of the more popular sound editors include Adobe Audition, Propellerhead's Recycle, and Sony's Sound Forge. I have personally grown accustomed to using Adobe Audition (formerly known as Cool Edit) for my own sound editing needs and it retails for $349. Just like the software sequencers I mentioned earlier, there are shareware versions available and I highly recommend trying them all to find out which you're most comfortable with using. Fortunately, if you don't want to spend another $349 right away, the Producer Edition of FL Studio 6 comes with a standard wave editor with some basic features such as record, cut, copy, paste, etc. Here is a quick look at wave editor in FL Studio Producer Edition.